What is the Poppy Appeal?

The Poppy Appeal is the Royal British Legion’s biggest fundraising campaign held every year in November, the period of Remembrance.

** This content is about the 2016 Poppy Appeal **

Each year, an army of volunteers distribute our iconic paper poppies throughout the nation, collecting donations in return to help support the vital work we do for the Armed Forces community.

Members of the public wear the paper poppy on their chest as a symbol of Remembrance: to remember the fallen Service men and women killed in conflict.

A number of Remembrance events, such as Remembrance Sunday, are held during the Poppy Appeal to commemorate the fallen.

Poppy Days

Our main fundraising events during the Poppy Appeal are all about bringing communities together to fundraise and enjoy themselves in the process.

Numerous cities across the country dedicate a day to distributing poppies and getting the public involved through activities and entertainment, from military bands to NFL cheerleaders.

To see what you can expect from your nearest Poppy Day, take a look at last year's successful event in Leeds.

How it all began

The first Poppy Appeal was held in 1921, the founding year of The Royal British Legion. Red silk poppies, inspired by the famous First World War poem In Flanders Fields, sold out instantly and raised more than £106,000. The funds helped WW1 veterans find employment and housing after the war.

The following year, the Poppy Factory was set up, employing disabled ex-Servicemen to create the poppies to sell during the appeal. Today, the factory still produces millions of poppies each year.

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