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Royal Navy At Omaha Beach

The casualties at Omaha Beach were far higher than the other Normandy landing beaches, and it would later become known as “bloody Omaha”.

There is an idea in the public mind of Omaha beach as an all-American beach, an idea reinforced by the memorable landings sequence in Steven Spielberg’s ‘Saving Private Ryan.’ That sequence however, while cinematically powerful, was not entirely accurate.

551 LCA Flotilla copy

551 Assault Flotilla

It is often forgotten, for example, that US soldiers arriving at the Dog Green sector of Omaha Beach did so aboard British landing craft, operated by members of the Royal Navy.

551 Assault Flotilla

It is often forgotten, for example, that US soldiers arriving at the Dog Green sector of Omaha Beach did so aboard British landing craft, operated by members of the Royal Navy.

In 2009, specialist historian Martyn Cox decided to address this gap in the D-Day story and began filming oral history interviews with surviving Royal Navy veterans who - like his late father - had brought in American troops, tanks and vehicles to Omaha. Martyn's film, produced especially for the 75th anniversary of D-Day, ensures that the contributions and experiences of those Royal Navy veterans at Omaha are finally realised.

Omaha Beach, Dog Green sign 

Their compelling and poignant first-hand testimony reveals how their LCAs (Landing Craft, Assault) had, in the first few hours, put ashore under heavy fire more than a thousand US Rangers plus A-Company of the US Army's 116th Regiment.

We are proud to be able to share with you the memories of those Royal Navy veterans who made such an important contribution to one of the most significant episodes of the Second World War.

To read more personal accounts of those who played a role in the complex effort that was D-Day and to appreciate the diversity of nations and necessary skills involved, explore the stories below.

The Stories of D-Day

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