Poppies - the symbol of Remembrance

Poppy Appeal

Why I wear my poppy

Find out why some of our supporters and beneficiaries wear their poppy. Tell us why you wear your poppy via our online form or share on Facebook at #mypoppy.

Read more on why our sports star supporters are wearing their poppy this year. 

Abbi Reid

Abbi ReidPetty Officer (Electronic Warfare) Abbi Reid, HMS Somerset, is wearing her poppy this year as a symbol of pride for the bravery of fellow Service men and women.

Such a pretty, delicate, innocent flower the poppy is, some might even say a little too pretty, delicate and innocent to be the symbol of World War 1. ‘The flower of eternal sleep’ it has been known to be called, but what does it represent and why do we wear it? It represents loss and sorrow, both rather sombre representations don’t you think? Importantly it allows us to remember all those lost in battle, it’s a time when we can stop and reflect on the true heroic actions that were taken by our country men and women, those that fought for us, fought for you. It is not a time to be sombre, as they would not want that, but a time to have faith and pride for those that have passed away for our country. So, why do I wear my poppy? To let people know that I remember and that I am proud of my fellow Service men, countrymen and all those who fell during the War, for “We will remember them.”

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Jane Scott

Jane Scott Jane Scott Leader Wiltshire Council, is wearing her poppy this year to remember the huge sacrifices made for us by our Armed Forces throughout the decades. 

I wear my poppy with pride every year in Remembrance of those Service men and women who have died since 1914 to keep us free and safe. I wear it as a symbol of thanks to them and their families for the ultimate sacrifice they have made for their country and communities.

 Wiltshire has a strong military tradition and there is an added significance to wearing my poppy with pride as Leader of Wiltshire Council.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Louise Lee

Louise LeeLouise Lee joined the Stewards branch of The Royal Navy in 2000 and transferred to the Royal Navy Police in 2013. She is wearing her poppy this year to keep the memory alive of family members who served in the Armed Forces, and to champion the needs of our current generation of Service men and women.  

I joined the Royal Navy as I wanted to serve my country, like my father and other relatives before me, it is so important to remember those who have fallen in the fight for our freedom and for those that continue to ensure our freedom today. It is important to keep their memories alive whilst raising awareness and assistance for those Service men and women today who need it most. We need to ensure that our future generations understand and appreciate our history and why we serve our country today.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Mike Wilson

Mike Wilson

Mike Wilson Director of Operations, County Durham Emergency Medical Services, is wearing his poppy this year in Remembrance for the tragic loss of his brother and to support the Legion's important welfare work for members of the Armed Forces.  

I have always worn my poppy with pride, as a symbol of Remembrance for those that have made the ultimate sacrifice, our fallen. This symbol has now become even more poignant following the death of my identical twin brother Lance Corporal David Wilson in Iraq 2008. In the following years the Royal British Legion (RBL) helped and supported our family through tough times, assisting us through David’s inquest in February this year.

The Poppy Appeal is not only a way of remembering our fallen, but it is also a vital way in which we can all support the important work of the Royal British Legion. So let’s all wear our poppy with pride and remember.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Andreas Antona

Andreas AntonaChef, Andreas Antona, is wearing his poppy this year in Remembrance and gratitude for the huge sacrifices made for our country by our Armed Forces today and in the past.

Remembrance is a time of reflection and I’d like to take the opportunity to thank our Armed Forces from the bottom of my heart. Their efforts should be acknowledged by every generation because the sacrifice of our troops, past and present, allows us to live the lives we lead today. Lest we Forget - may be an old fashioned saying but it’s very profound and especially relevant in today’s age. There shouldn’t be anyone not humble enough to show respect to all those who have fought and fallen for us. Wearing a poppy with pride is my way of showing mine.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Alan Knell

Alan Knell PAO CheshireAlan Knell, Poppy Appeal Organiser, is wearing his poppy this year to remember the fallen and to ensure that returning Service men and women receive all the support they need. 

It’s with great pride that I am able to work for The Royal British Legion's Poppy Appeal. I served for nine years in the Royal Navy, and after leaving the service, I wanted to help members of the Armed Forces that had been less lucky than I had been in my service and in 'civvy life'.

You see the final amount raised for the Poppy Appeal and it’s a great feeling to know I have made a big difference to so many people by collecting.

With the troops coming home shortly from their role in Afghanistan, we now need to work so hard to support all members of the Armed Forces past and present, and sadly the families that have been left behind after the loss of a loved one.

The Appeal has also grown in importance to me over the years, a friend of mine was sadly killed in Afghanistan by an Improvised Explosive Device, before he deployed he promised to come and help sell poppy’s with me in his uniform... sadly he never got the chance, so every year I do it for him.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Matthew Clark

Matthew Clark

Able Seaman (Logistics) Matthew Clark, HMS Somerset, is wearing his poppy this year as a mark of Remembrance for men and women who have given their lives in conflicts, and to support The Royal British Legion's vital welfare work for ex-Service personnel. 

I wear a poppy on Remembrance Day not only to remember Service personnel that have lost their lives in war but to also support ex-Service personnel. With the conflict that has gone on in recent years with Afghanistan and Iraq it makes it especially important for us to remember the people that have given their lives for us to live currently in peace. The Poppy Appeal allows us to not only remember the lives that have been lost but to also directly help The Royal British Legion assist ex-Service personnel who are suffering financial distress through the money raised in selling poppies. I am proud to wear my poppy along with the millions of others around the world and observe my act of Remembrance.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Steve Double

Steve Double Poppy 1

Steve Double, Mayor of St Austell, is wearing his poppy this year to honour the bravery of his Grandfather and all those who serve in our Armed Forces. 

Whenever I put on my poppy my thoughts go to my Grandfather. ‘Pop’ was in the navy during the war and served on several ships as an engineer. Like many of his generation he didn’t readily talk about his experiences but on the occasions when he did share them with us I would love listening to his memories of that time. He served with sacrifice, pride and distinction – being mentioned in dispatches a number of times. Wearing a poppy helps us to remember with gratitude all those who serve to defend our nation, past and present.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy#mypoppy.

Hannah Beckett

Hannah Beckett

Able Seaman, Hannah Beckett, HMS Gannet, is wearing her poppy this year as a mark of comradeship for Forces personnel in all three Services. 

I wear my poppy out of respect for my fellow comrades who have lost their lives or who have been injured during their course of duty. I think the Royal British Legion is vital in providing support to not only current serving personnel but ex-serving personnel and their families. After experiencing Afghanistan for myself last year, I now have a better understanding of the sacrifices that the soldiers and sailors make for our country out on the front line.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Sarah Barton

Sarah Barton VOLUNTEER Rochdale

Sarah Barton, Volunteer, The Royal British Legion, is wearing her poppy this year in support of the Legion’s welfare work - providing practical, emotional and financial help to returning Service people.

I wear my poppy with pride. Volunteering for the Royal British Legion is a fantastic and worthwhile experience and something that I truly believe in. I have now been a volunteer for over two years. My granddad joined the 44 Royal Marine Commandos in 1943 and I remember the stories he used to tell me as a child of his experiences serving in Burma. He was a member of The Royal British Legion and Burma Star Association until his death in 2005. When leaving the Armed Forces, ex-Servicemen and Women are faced with many issues such as isolation, unemployment, poverty, homelessness, low self-esteem, mental health issues etc. and it is important to have a charity such as The Royal British Legion to support them in overcoming these issues. This is why it is crucial to have the Poppy Appeal because without this they would not be able to get the full support they need in order to build a better future for themselves.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Peter Williams

Peter Williams

Peter Williams, Secretary of the Oakhampton Branch of The Royal British Legion, is wearing his poppy this year in recognition of the sacrifices made by the Armed Forces community to protect our freedoms.

As an ex-Serviceman, I know how important it is for a serving soldier to feel that his job is valued by the public. Wearing the poppy once a year is just one way to demonstrate my support for the Service community.

The poppy represents the suffering caused by wars and conflicts. Thus, my wearing it serves as a reminder to the community that people care.

Finally, it is a way of giving thanks for the sacrifices of our forefathers so that we can lead the comfortable lives of today.

It is also a symbol of my commitment to upholding the aims of The Royal British Legion.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Katy Bourne

Katy Bourne

Katy Bourne, Sussex Police and Crime Commissioner, is wearing her poppy with pride this year to show support for the work The Royal British Legion does all year round improving the lives of Forces personnel.

As the wife of a former serviceman and Falklands veteran, I wear my poppy to show support for all the men and women who have fought and died for our country. I wear my poppy for the families who live daily with the worry of whether they will see their loved ones again. I wear my poppy to show support for the tremendous work of the Royal British Legion in helping the injured and bereaved from the traumas of war. I wear my poppy because I think it's important - for yesterday's heroes like my grandfather and today's too. I wear it because I think it matters. I hope you will too.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Viv Cunningham

Viv Cunningham PAO Cheshire

Viv Cunnningham, Poppy Appeal Organiser, is the mother of the UK's youngest PAO, Jamie Cunningham. She is wearing the poppy this year as a mark of respect for the Service of her family members - past and present.

I come from a Forces family. Grandfather fought in the trenches and survived Ypres. Dad flew in Lancasters and Wellingtons in Bomber Command and served 22 years. I was a Women's Royal Air Force Air Traffic Control Officer for 18 years and married an RAF Engineering Officer who did 27 years’ service. His father also flew in Bomber Command. Both my brothers were in the RAF.

It would have been impossible therefore, not to have been aware of Remembrance and all that wearing a poppy signifies. In addition, conflicts during my own lifetime have brought home the importance of never forgetting the sacrifice made by members of our Armed Forces and their families. So I wear my poppy with pride to show that I remember.

 Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Jim Gilligan

Jim Gilligan Jim Gilligan, Battle Back Centre Technical Advisor and Coach, is wearing his poppy this year to keep alive the memory of his Great Grandfather and all those who have given their lives in service.  

In 1914 my Great Grandfather who was a Corporal in an Irish Regiment said farewell to his family by announcing he was going for a haircut and to his son my Grandfather 'I'm just off for a hair-cut son.' They never saw him again.  Sadly, my Grandfather never found his father's resting place, but later in 1986 the rest of the family located the grave near Poperinge in Belgium. Three generations of my family fought to give me the freedom and quality of life that I enjoy today and that shape daily life. I wear my poppy to remind me of their sacrifice and that of many others.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Stephen Sheldon

Stephen Sheldon And Son RhysStephen Sheldon, a Royal British Legion beneficiary, is wearing his poppy in Remembrance this year for comrades and colleagues lost in the line of duty. 

My family and I wear our poppies to remember the great sacrifice soldiers and their families have made, and are making, to ensure Great Britain remains a free country. It is even more significant as I'm an ex-soldier and have lost a few good friends in the past couple of years, so I think wearing it shows their families that they are not forgotten. 

The Royal British legion is a unique charity as it supports members, past and present, of all three Services. It gives support to those in need at any time during and after their Service. It ensures that ex-Service men and women are not forgotten. I am proud to support an organisation such as this.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Jamie Cunningham

Jamie Cunningham UKS YOUNGEST PAO CheshireJamie Cunningham, the UK's youngest Poppy Appeal Organiser from Cheshire, is wearing his poppy this year as a mark of respect for the sacrifices made by the Armed Forces community - past and present.

Wearing a poppy shows your support, respect and admiration for the people and their families that have fought and are fighting for us...I wear my poppy to show that I remember. I wear my poppy to show that I care.

Share your story and tell us why you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Flight Lieutenant Sherry Conway

Flight Lieutenant Sherry Conway Flight Lieutenant Sherry Conway joined the RAF as Medic in 1996 and was commissioned in 2009. She is wearing her poppy this year as a symbol of respect and gratitude for the men and women who sacrifice their lives in the line of duty. 

I remember those who fought and died in WW1 and WW2 and personally reflect on the friends and colleagues that have died on Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. My thoughts are filled with admiration for the patients (and their families) that I have had the honour to nurse during their Critical Care Air Support (CCAST) repatriations from Operational Theatres. The poppy is the symbol of ‘hope’ born from the tragedy of war.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Gethin Jones

Child -Shaking -HandTV presenter Gethin Jones is wearing his poppy as a mark of respect to those in the Armed Forces who have sacrificed everything. 

I've always worn my poppy with pride. After visiting our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan on a few occasions, it has increased my understanding of their sacrifice and my passion to support them. So many wonderful men and women of our Armed Forces past and present, have given everything of themselves to keep us safe. A small way for me to say thank you to them, is to wear my poppy.

Share your story and tell us why you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Kelda Wood

KeldaKelda Wood, our Battle Back Centre Coach, is wearing her poppy this year to remember her grandfather who was killed during the World War II. 

I admire the sacrifice that guys in the military make in order to do the job that they do and I am proud to show my support by wearing the poppy.

Share your story and tell us why you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Mollie King

Mollie Why I Wear My PoppyMollie King, member of The Saturdays, is wearing her poppy this year to honour all the service men and women who are currently fighting and risking their lives every day for our country. 

Both of my granddads fought in World War II and I look up to them as a massive inspiration. If I have a bad day I think about everyone risking their lives for us every day and it puts everything in perspective. Buying a poppy goes such a long way towards supporting them and I am proud to wear one to show my support.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy

Dave Moretta

Dave -Moretta -BENEFICIARY-Lancashire

Dave Moretta, our beneficiary and supporter who spent five years serving in the Queen’s Lancashire Regiment is wearing his poppy this year as a sign of respect to his fallen comrades that he once brushed shoulders with on the battlefield.

My poppy is a symbol of my appreciation to our Armed Forces for keeping our nation safe so my children can play happily without the burden of conflict on their shoulders.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

Paul Ricklesford

Paul RicklesfordRegulating Petty Officer from HMS Monmouth Paul Ricklesford is wearing his poppy this year to commemorate his granddad who was injured in 1944 at D-Day and all Servicemen and women who had the courage to lay down their life to preserve the freedom of others.

Wearing a poppy is not only about remembering the fallen, but also about recognising the sacrifices of today's armed forces, our veterans and their families.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

George Shelley

UnionJ George Shelley, member of Union J boy band, is wearing his poppy this year to commemorate the ultimate sacrifices made by the Armed Forces personnel and as a symbol of his personal pride.

I have a brother serving in the Royal Marines. I think of my brother every time I put my Poppy on, I thank God he’s still with us and remember those that have gone before.

Share your story and tell us why do you wear your poppy #mypoppy.

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